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He studied philosophy, was awarded for his skills as a pianist, attended France’s elite Ecole Nationale d’Administration for graduate school and worked at Rothschild as a successful investment banker. French people discovered Macron when he was nominated economy minister in August 2014, after two years as a top adviser to Socialist President Francois Hollande. As a minister, he rapidly became a love-it-or-hate-it topic during family meals around the country. A package of economic measures to allow more stores to open Sundays and open up regulated sectors of the economy, known as the Macron law, drove tens of thousands of people to the streets for months of protests across France. Outspoken, he fierily advocated for pro-free market policies even as many colleagues from the governing Socialists accused him of destroying worker protections. Yet he comes from a town with working-class roots Amiens in northern France, where he was born, grew up, and met Brigitte. Observers suggested Macron played a double game when he quit the Socialist government last year without telling Hollande his true ambitions. He launched his presidential bid in November before the unpopular president had announced whether he would seek re-election. Macron’s entry into the race is viewed as one of the main factors behind Hollande’s decision not to pursue a second term. “What seduced a lot of people -and I think he is not a seducer- it’s his capacity of putting forward an argument, taking time to speak, taking time to ponder,” Mongin said.

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RETIRE ELDERLY SWINDLES ADV16 1 Mariana Cooper, a Lynnwood, Wash., widow living by herself, who was swindled out of more than $217,000. Lecoq, 41, said in a telephone interview from her home in Camano Island, Wash. But then they say they didnt know it was a crime, or they didnt know it could be reported or punished. Her own grandmother, Mariana Cooper, 87, whose financial exploitation was recounted in a 2015 New York Times article, was swindled by Janet Bauml, who had insinuated herself into her life and whom she had come to trust. Over time, Ms. Cooper, a widow living by herself, gave more than $217,000 to Ms. Bauml, expecting to be paid back. When she sheepishly admitted to her granddaughter that she had been defrauded, Ms. Lecoq spent months calling law enforcement agents and prosecutors to help make a case for serious theft. In late 2015, Ms. Bauml was sentenced to 3 years in prison. http://nevaehpattersonchat.macsverige.org/2017/04/19/some-challenges-for-necessary-details-of-online-training-for-curriculum-vitae/After that, Ms.

For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.post-gazette.com/aging-edge/aging-edge-reports/2017/04/17/Declaring-War-on-Financial-Abuse-of-Older-People/stories/201704170101

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